Mortgage Tips for Single Homebuyers With Children

If you’re a single parent, it’s arguably more challenging to buy a home than for those in a partnership with dual incomes. Yet it’s easy to see why so many single parents are eager to purchase a house. Beyond finding a perfect kitchen and playroom, owning a home is an integral part of building a healthy financial future.

And while homeownership may seem like an increasingly out-of-reach dream for single moms and dads, buying a house is definitely an achievable reality for most folks. To help inform you on this journey, read more HERE.

How To Refinance Your Home If Your Spouse or Partner Recently Passed Away

The death of a spouse or partner is a painful, overwhelming experience. Quite apart from the emotional loss, it can be difficult to have to handle your finances suddenly on your own, including your home mortgage.

While this is not an easy payment to face, remember that federal law prohibits lenders from requiring the surviving spouse to pay the entire mortgage amount due upon a spouse’s passing.

If you’re considering the refinancing route as someone who recently faced loss, here’s what you need to know.

What Is House Shame?

The feeling of house shame—sometimes also called “housebarrassment”—is precisely what it sounds like: a deep sense of discomfort when it comes time to introduce your home to others. House shame, much like body shame, is something many people worldwide have dealt with, long before there was a name for it.

Unfortunately, the prevalence of house shame appears to be on the rise. So we reached out to several experts to figure out why we all occasionally blush at the idea of opening our front door to visitors.

We discovered that house shame has an array of causes—and thankfully, solutions. Read on to learn how you can turn those negative emotions into empowerment.

Refinancing for the Recently Divorced

Divorce happens. And whether you’re consciously uncoupling or unceremoniously ending a failing relationship, splitting up for good can be a long and emotionally draining period wrought with legal fees and endless paperwork. On top of all that, there’s the tricky issue of dividing up shared property.

Your marital home is likely the most significant asset you and your partner own together. While many couples agree to sell the home and share the profits when they split, sometimes one partner buys out the other. But solo homeownership can be challenging—and that’s where considering a refinance of your mortgage comes in.

Keep in mind that refinancing requires taking out a new home loan, which means you’ll have to meet eligibility requirements before you’re approved. And though you and your partner may have sailed through a loan approval when jointly buying your home, the process can be different when you’re single.

So here’s what you need to know about refinancing your mortgage when you end a relationship.

Many Underestimate These Home Improvement Costs

First-time homebuyers may assume that once they purchase their home—an expensive feat these days—they are done bleeding money. However, they may not be properly budgeting for common home improvement projects, which can be substantial.

Many Americans are underestimating the price of many popular home improvement and maintenance projects, such as installing new windows, doing the landscaping, and painting the interiors.

Read more HERE.

5 Types of Clutter

No matter how organized you are, there are certain types of clutter that are almost impossible to purge—even for professional organizers.

Often these are dark, less-trafficked areas of the home such as attics, basements, or garages. Decluttering these spots often falls dead last on everyone’s to-do list, and even the experts often let these messes slide.

Still, cleaning up these last holdouts can be particularly satisfying since it’s a sign you truly have your house in order. And if you’re hoping to sell your home soon, it’s a must. Curious where these clutter traps are hiding?

Here are a few that you (and even professional organizers) may have, and how to purge them for good.

Can a Buyer Inspect a Home Without a Seller’s Permission?

Here’s the scenario: Your house is on the market and you have interested buyers, but they are concerned about the roof. Maybe your home has a bit of damage from the last storm, but it’s nothing major.

Still, a potential buyer sends a roofer to check things out without your approval. Sending a professional to somehow inspect the condition of your home unannounced may seem a bit bold on the buyer’s part. Can a potential buyer send someone—be it a roofer, inspector, or contractor—to inspect a home or snoop around outside without the seller’s consent?

Here’s what the experts have to say about this sticky situation.

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