What Is Knob and Tube Wiring, and Is It Hiding in Your Home?

What is knob and tube wiring? While it might sound like a bad 1990s indie band, it’s actually an outdated electrical system that’s still found in many old homes in the United States.

Often abbreviated as K&T, this early standard—widespread in residences built from the 1880s to the 1930s—is often considered a hazard today, depending on how it was installed.

So if a home you’re hoping to buy has it, you’ll want to have it examined closely and possibly replaced. Why?

Here’s everything you never knew you needed to know about ye olde knob and tube.

Budget-Friendly Ways To Update Your Bedroom

The bedroom is a private retreat that should evoke a sense of calm—but getting to this sweet spot can take some work. Renovating your bedroom might be the solution, but a small budget or the fact that you rent might get in the way.

Still, you don’t have to settle for a hot mess in the boudoir. With some savvy updates and even DIY fixes, your resting place can be the haven you’ve always dreamed of and deserved.

To help, check out the advice gathered from design pros so you can upgrade your bedroom without the mess and cost of full-on renovations.

Is My Home in a Flood Zone?

Ahome’s risk of flooding—from hurricanes or a huge downpour—is probably not the first thing you’d think to check. However, the fact is that many U.S. homes lie within flood zones, and as the recent Yellowstone flooding illustrates all too clearly, many homeowners aren’t properly aware of the risks, or prepared to take them on.

Ideally, you want to size up this potential and take precautions if necessary well before you might end up underwater!

Most homes in high-risk flood zones are near a body of water. For instance, the Gulf Coast is one of the U.S. regions most vulnerable to hurricanes that cause flooding. Yet more than 20% of flood-related home insurance claims happen in non-flood zones, so no one should assume they’re safe.

Read more HERE.

Bigger Isn’t Always Better

After the mad dash by homebuyers to purchase larger places to live in at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, some experts are making a case for more efficiently designed, smaller homes.

With the pandemic seemingly waning, mortgage rates and home prices rising, and builders struggling to get anything up in the face of supply chain shortages, there’s a convincing argument to be made that home shoppers should consider seeking smaller houses.

A new book by Sheri Koones, “Bigger Than Tiny, Smaller Than Average,” posits that functionality is more important than square footage.

Read more HERE.

7 Tips for Pollen-Proofing Your Home

Ah, spring! The days are getting longer, the flowers are blossoming, and, oh yeah, your head’s been throbbing for a solid two weeks from all the pollen floating around. If you feel you’ve been suffering a bit more than usual this allergy season, take some solace in knowing that you have plenty of company.

Due to the climate crisis and our ever-warming planet, ​​future allergy seasons are likely to start more than a month earlier and be far more intense. Add that to an already arduous allergy season, which typically begins with tree pollen in March and ends with grass pollen in August, and you’re going to need all the antihistamines (and help) you can get.

So how the heck can you keep this pollen frenzy from entering your home and wreaking havoc on your system every minute of every day? Create an indoor sanctuary, of course.

Here’s how…

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